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See also:  http://www.theverge.com/2014/8/28/6078517/stop-ruining-my-escapist-fantasies-sarkeesian-haters

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Also:  trends may come and go, but knowledge is always in style.

Also:  trends may come and go, but knowledge is always in style.

(Source: pwplsteens, via theinnkeeperlibrarian)

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comaniddy:

explainers-nysci:

Thomas explains what he loves about science, the puzzle which is never truly solved. It’s not about finding the solution, but about the journey you take.

Watch Thomas’s video here: http://youtu.be/IL5VRLISTs8

And follow him on tumblr! scienceing

The Science is strong with this one.

(via nysci)

Tags: chemistry
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ucresearch:

Police often provoke protest violence, UC researchers find
Violent protests can often be unintentionally provoked by aggressive law enforcement tactics like approaching demonstrators in riot gear or the use of military-style formations, according to a team of researchers at UC Berkeley.

"Everything starts to turn bad when you see a police officer come out of an SUV and he’s carrying an AR-15," said Nick Adams, a sociologist and fellow at UC Berkeley’s Institute for Data Science who leads the Deciding Force Project. "It just upsets the crowd."

The researchers found that some law enforcement agencies are taking less provocative measures to calm the crowd.

During the Occupy protests, for example, police in some cities deployed officers in small clusters rather than in skirmish lines. Such cities tended to see fewer clashes between demonstrators and police, the researchers said.
"When it’s two or three officers, protesters don’t get intimidated," Adams said. "They may even talk with the police."

Read more about steps some law enforcement agencies are taking to reduce protest violence

ucresearch:

Police often provoke protest violence, UC researchers find

Violent protests can often be unintentionally provoked by aggressive law enforcement tactics like approaching demonstrators in riot gear or the use of military-style formations, according to a team of researchers at UC Berkeley.

"Everything starts to turn bad when you see a police officer come out of an SUV and he’s carrying an AR-15," said Nick Adams, a sociologist and fellow at UC Berkeley’s Institute for Data Science who leads the Deciding Force Project. "It just upsets the crowd."

The researchers found that some law enforcement agencies are taking less provocative measures to calm the crowd.

During the Occupy protests, for example, police in some cities deployed officers in small clusters rather than in skirmish lines. Such cities tended to see fewer clashes between demonstrators and police, the researchers said.

"When it’s two or three officers, protesters don’t get intimidated," Adams said. "They may even talk with the police."

Read more about steps some law enforcement agencies are taking to reduce protest violence

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skunkbear:

Our video about a science rapping competition just won a "Salute To Excellence" award from the National Assocation of Black Journalists!

It is an honor to win, and it was an honor to meet all the incredibly talented young rappers. I still have their songs stuck in my head. Check out their sweet science rhymes here:

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reportagebygettyimages:

I came to realize that the majority of the gang members, girls and boys, were often sexually abused in their childhood. Knowing this truth allows us to understand their aggressive behavior and the abuses they commit…To understand does not mean to justify, but having this knowledge can allow us to better fight the root causes.’ 

-Miquel Dewever-Plana, who was awarded a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography in 2010 for his work documenting Guatemala’s ‘Other War.’

2014 marks the tenth anniversary of the Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography program, which has now awarded almost $1 million in funding to photojournalists. As we prepare to announce this year’s winners on September 4 at Visa Pour l’Image, we are taking a look back at some of the winners from the past 10 years. See more on In Focus.

Link

RICE is a long-standing treatment method, but there is evidence that suggests that using ice to treat injuries may not be the best treatment after all.  This would be an interesting topic to research further!

Tags: Kinesiology
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0salt:

Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

This is an important message on how privilege really works.

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl, via theinnkeeperlibrarian)

Tags: sociology cgis
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laughingsquid:

Dad Compiles Even More Special Effects Videos Starring His Three-Year-Old Son in Volume Two of ‘Action Movie Kid’

Welcome back to college, everyone!  Where will your imagination take YOU this year?

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halftheskymovement:

 “They didn’t expect to see a Muslim girl box. It’s like, oh my god, a woman’s doing something. She’s not staying at home and just being a housewife,” says Ambreen Sadiq, one of Britain’s first Muslim female boxers.
Throughout her boxing journey, the 20-year-old former UK champion has faced serious prejudice from the British Muslim community, her neighbors, her school friends and even some members of her family. She says she has been bullied in school and even received death threats after her sister made her a Facebook fan page. Though she is disappointed at the lack of support from the Muslim and Asian community in the UK, Sadiq remains undeterred and continues to box.
“Anything that you do, there are going to be people that are negative and don’t like it. You have to decide: do you want to do what you love, or do you want to please other people? Don’t let anyone get in the way of your dream no matter who it is,” she says in a recent interview with the Telegraph.

halftheskymovement:

 “They didn’t expect to see a Muslim girl box. It’s like, oh my god, a woman’s doing something. She’s not staying at home and just being a housewife,” says Ambreen Sadiq, one of Britain’s first Muslim female boxers.

Throughout her boxing journey, the 20-year-old former UK champion has faced serious prejudice from the British Muslim community, her neighbors, her school friends and even some members of her family. She says she has been bullied in school and even received death threats after her sister made her a Facebook fan page. Though she is disappointed at the lack of support from the Muslim and Asian community in the UK, Sadiq remains undeterred and continues to box.

“Anything that you do, there are going to be people that are negative and don’t like it. You have to decide: do you want to do what you love, or do you want to please other people? Don’t let anyone get in the way of your dream no matter who it is,” she says in a recent interview with the Telegraph.