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compoundchem:

Before the World Cup semi-finals kick off later today, why not learn about the chemistry of the World Cup Ball with the latest Reactions video?

The Compound Interest graphic the video was based on, and more detailed information, can be found here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-jT

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Enjoy your summer!  I’ll be updating occasionally during the break, but we’ll return to our regularly scheduled programming in the fall.

Enjoy your summer!  I’ll be updating occasionally during the break, but we’ll return to our regularly scheduled programming in the fall.

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Inversion Poses for Running Recovery

Click for the video!

Tags: kinesiology
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Mothra

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programmedradly:

xparrot:


The interval between the start and the end of “I’m Gonna Be (500 Miles)” is 3 minutes and 30 seconds, and the International Space Station is moving is 7.66 km/s.
This means that if an astronaut on the ISS listens to “I’m Gonna Be”, in the time between the first beat of the song and the final lines …
… they will have traveled just about exactly 1,000 miles.

—What If: Orbital Speed

gosh!

programmedradly:

xparrot:

The interval between the start and the end of “I’m Gonna Be (500 Miles)” is 3 minutes and 30 seconds, and the International Space Station is moving is 7.66 km/s.

This means that if an astronaut on the ISS listens to “I’m Gonna Be”, in the time between the first beat of the song and the final lines …

… they will have traveled just about exactly 1,000 miles.

What If: Orbital Speed

gosh!

(via theinnkeeperlibrarian)

Tags: physics
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scienceisbeauty:

Charges Ahead by Julie Fletcher:

"I followed a massive storm front for several hundred kilometers hoping to capture something special, but this blew my mind. The surreal milky green water is a natural phenomenon caused by electromagnetic activity from the lightning hitting the water’s surface. There was no rain where I was and not much wind either, but in the distance the sky was charged and angry, subjecting its wrath [to] the graveyard of dead trees in this normally very dry lakebed. I was able to capture a series of unique images, this being one of the best."

Photo Location: Menindee Lakes, New South Wales, Australia
This photo was submitted to the 2013 National Geographic Photo Contest (and  received an Honorable Mention)

scienceisbeauty:

Charges Ahead by Julie Fletcher:

"I followed a massive storm front for several hundred kilometers hoping to capture something special, but this blew my mind. The surreal milky green water is a natural phenomenon caused by electromagnetic activity from the lightning hitting the water’s surface. There was no rain where I was and not much wind either, but in the distance the sky was charged and angry, subjecting its wrath [to] the graveyard of dead trees in this normally very dry lakebed. I was able to capture a series of unique images, this being one of the best."

Photo Location: Menindee Lakes, New South Wales, Australia

This photo was submitted to the 2013 National Geographic Photo Contest (and  received an Honorable Mention)

Tags: chemistry
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How Chemistry Works: Gorgeous Vintage Science Diagrams, 1854 
via Brainpickings
Tags: tbt chemistry
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laboratoryequipment:

Getting a Grip on Your Real AgeNew research by Warren Sanderson from Stony Brook Univ. and Sergei Scherbov from Austrian Academy of Sciences into aging shows that the strength of your grasp may be one of the most useful ways to measure your true age.Different measures of physical abilities can be assessed to determine how old someone is including walking speed, standing balance, the speed they can rise from sitting. The researchers found that hand grip strength, a measure of upper-body strength that has been widely studied, is consistently a good indicator of future mortality and susceptibility to disease.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/getting-grip-your-real-age

laboratoryequipment:

Getting a Grip on Your Real Age

New research by Warren Sanderson from Stony Brook Univ. and Sergei Scherbov from Austrian Academy of Sciences into aging shows that the strength of your grasp may be one of the most useful ways to measure your true age.

Different measures of physical abilities can be assessed to determine how old someone is including walking speed, standing balance, the speed they can rise from sitting. The researchers found that hand grip strength, a measure of upper-body strength that has been widely studied, is consistently a good indicator of future mortality and susceptibility to disease.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/getting-grip-your-real-age

Photoset

ucresearch:

The resurrection plant


Once most organisms die their life-cycle is complete, but for this plant its just a step in the process.  Commonly found in the desert, it can be blown for miles and miles on the sand for up to several decades as a lifeless bunch of brown branches.  

The rare instance when rain appears is when things get interesting.  When the resurrection plant lands in say a puddle of rain water, it’s branches start to open up exposing it’s seeds.  As the rain drops hit these seeds it scatters them around the puddle of water.  Within days the seedlings appear and grow very quickly.  Bugs pollinate the small white flowers of the young plants.

However, once the rain goes away, the plant dies in the hot desert sun only to start the cycle over again as a tumble weed bouncing around until the next storm.

Each of these stages of the plant are called phenological events.  Where the root word pheno means “to appear”.  

Watch what plants can tell us about climate change →

(Source: youtube.com)

Photoset

lewisandquark:

Light in a circular cavity makes a variety of standing wave patterns, some of which look like flowers, wagon wheels, or even tie-fighter spaceships. These images are from my simulations of the light in the cavities of nanolasers - each pattern is called a mode, and the smaller the laser, the simpler the mode tends to be. 

In our lasers, the modes that tend to do the best are the whispering gallery modes - for example, the rightmost mode on the second row.  Whispering gallery modes get their name from the whispering gallery phenomenon first noticed with sound waves in cathedral domes. People noticed that if they stood along the perimeter of some cathedral domes, the sound waves from a whisper would bounce along the walls of the dome, and could be clearly heard at certain other places along the dome’s perimeter.  Whispering gallery modes appear not just for light and sound, but for other kinds of waves as well, like matter waves and gravitational waves.

(via freshphotons)

Tags: physics