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socimages:

Who cleans up city fun?

By Lisa Wade, PhD

This series of pictures is from a San Francisco Chronicle article about flash mobs, or “an international fad, partly anarchistic, partly absurdist, in which a mob of participants suddenly materializes at a public place, engages in odd behavior [like pillow or shaving cream fights] and then disperses.”  

This last picture is of Martin Condol, one of the city workers brought it to clean up after the revelers. He is the only worker to be included in the photographs — appearing in two images of the 20 — despite the fact that the article was specifically about the problem and expense involved in cleaning up.

Though many of us see such workers in our everyday lives, they are very rarely made visible in news accounts of the world. Even when they’re relevant, news producers seem to prefer to show the faces of happy white people to those of the men and women whose hard work keeps cities, businesses, and families flourishing.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

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It’s Banned Books Week!  Check out the website we’ve created to get a sneak peek at the new display in the lobby, and to learn about the books and comics that have come under fire (pun intended).

Wilhelm Reich display in Memorial Library

Wilhelm Reich display in Memorial Library

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teded:

View the TED-Ed Lesson The history of tattoos

If you have a tattoo, you’re part of a rich cultural history that dates back at least 8,000 years. Where did this practice of body modification come from, and how has its function changed over time? Addison Anderson tracks the history of getting inked.

Interested in learning more about the history of tattooing?  Check out Original Skin: Exploring the Marvels of the Human Hide from the library.

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explore-blog:

John Dewey on the true purpose of education and how to harness the power of our natural curiosity – a must-read for parents, teachers, and lifelong learners alike.

Curiosity + hard work —> learning

explore-blog:

John Dewey on the true purpose of education and how to harness the power of our natural curiosity – a must-read for parents, teachers, and lifelong learners alike.

Curiosity + hard work —> learning

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mentalflossr:

10 Foreign Words We Need in English—Illustrated!

Sometimes there is exactly the word you need - you just don’t have the tongue for speaking it yet.

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laughingsquid:

Non-Profit Group Donates Superhero-Themed 3D-Printed Prosthetic Hands to Children

Low-cost and AMAZING. 
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“‘Movement and play are important for both atypical and typical children,’ she [Angela Hanscomb] says.

"For example, take the simple act of moving your head off the vertical axis, by hanging upside down, spinning or swinging. This kind of action helps develop what is called the vestibular system. That means it’s giving the little hair cells inside our inner ear important input, helping us develop awareness of our own midline and shape. This, in turn, is crucial for walking or even for balance when sitting.

“‘The vestibular system helps support all your other senses,’ says Hanscomb. ‘If you don’t have a good idea of where your body is in space, you aren’t safe.’”

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A Simple Equation: More Education = More Income (Still)

Although we’ve all heard stories of college graduates facing financial difficulties, this NYT article reaffirms that college graduates on average still make considerably more than high school graduates.  However, educational attainment in America “trails nearly all other industrialized nations when it comes to educational equality. Barely 30 percent of American adults have achieved a higher level of education than their parents did…. And matters are getting worse, not better. Among 25- to 34-year olds, only 20 percent of men and 27 percent of women, both out of school, have achieved a higher level of education than their parents. It’s even bleaker at the bottom: Only one in 20 Americans aged 25 to 34 whose parents didn’t finish high school has a college degree. The average across 20 rich countries in the O.E.C.D. analysis is almost one in four.

Read the article at the New York Times:  “A Simple Equation: More Education = More Income”

Tags: sociology
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Experts explain why more women in group ex & give hints to get more men.

Tags: Kinesiology
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Tags: chemistry